NSAIDs May Be Linked To Increase In Heart Attack Risk, Study Suggests

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KEEPING OUR READERS INFORMED WITH THE LATEST NEWS UPDATES FROM THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION.

ABC World News Tonight (5/9, story 11, 0:25, Muir) reported a new analysis has found that “commonly used” analgesics “may increase the risk of heart attack.”

On its website, CBS News (5/9, Welch) reports that the research indicated that “all commonly used” non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) – “ibuprofen and naproxen, which are available over the counter; and diclofenac and celecoxib, which require prescriptions in the US – were associated with this increased risk.” The research was published in the British Medical Journal.

The New York Times (5/9, Bakalar, Subscription Publication) reports in “Well” that for the study, investigators conducted “a systematic review of studies involving more than 446,000 people ages 40 to 79, of whom more than 61,000 had heart attacks.”

TIME (5/9, Park) reports that investigators “found that some risks can appear after even a few days of using NSAIDs.” The study indicated that “compared with people who didn’t take the painkillers, those who did had a 20% to 50% greater chance of having a heart attack.” The investigators found that “the risk was higher for people who took 1,200 mg a day of ibuprofen…and 750 mg a day for naproxen.”

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