New Guidelines Proposed for Cervical Cancer Screening

Health Groups Issue Proposed Cervical Cancer Screening Guidelines

The American Cancer Society (ACS), the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP), and the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) have developed new guidelines for the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer. The proposed guidelines generally advise that women reduce the number of tests they get over their lifetime to better ensure that they receive the benefits of testing while minimizing the risks. The proposed guidelines also include a preference for co-testing using the Pap test and HPV test for women age 30 and over.

The proposed guidelines were released on the same day that the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) formally released its proposed guidelines update for cervical cancer screening. ACS, ASCCP and ASCP worked independently of the USPSTF to review existing evidence and develop these draft recommendations. The groups coordinated today’s release with the USPSTF to enable stakeholders to consider both sets of recommendations concurrently with the goal of creating consistent guidance that will lead to less confusion for providers and the public.

“These draft recommendations are being presented for review by interested individuals and stakeholders, primarily clinicians and researchers, who are invited to provide feedback through a web-based open comment period,” said Debbie Saslow, PhD, director of breast and gynecologic cancer for the American Cancer Society. “The six working groups that developed these recommendations will then consider the submitted comments, and make revisions to these proposed recommendations based on that input and available evidence.”

The working groups who drafted the proposed guidelines will meet along with delegates from 25 organizations at a symposium in November 2011 to further discuss and finalize the recommendations, which will then be adapted into a final guideline from the American Cancer Society, anticipated in mid-2012.

Read the entire article and proposed recommendations at:

pressroom.cancer.org

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